It’s of-fish-ally 2021!

Drawing empowers me with confidence. It is a reminder that I have the freedom to channel my creative side, whilst expressing my inner thoughts and feelings. It provides a sense of accomplishment every time I complete a new piece – for me, this is the moment when the thoughts in my mind fit together perfectly, like the pieces of a puzzle. Through my art, I can show people a different perspective of the world and know that I have contributed to a persons day, whether it be through a passing glance, a read of my post or a comment on my work.

What I love most is how impactful art can be for different people. Art speaks to anyone, at any level – it overcomes language barriers and can be interpreted by those who struggle to comprehend words. I would be lying to myself if I didn’t acknowledge that art is for the people. It’s the wonderful comments on my blog that motivate and inspire me to keep on creating content.

Happy New Year to everyone, thank you for your continued support on this blog and may 2021 provide some much needed light and happiness💫✨

Once Upon A Dream…

I was thinking about what to draw next and took inspiration for this artwork whilst re-decorating my room. It all happened when I came across a dream catcher, which I felt the urge to add to my existing collection. (I’ve always been a fan of dream catchers and have often contemplated getting one tattooed on my skin). 

Dream catchers typically comprise of a wooden circle, covered by thread, which is woven in an intricate pattern and finished with precious items, such as beads and feathers hanging from the bottom of the circle. 

The Dream Catcher originated from native America and is thought to have been invented by a tribe, with the purpose of protecting it’s young from being harmed. The concept of the dream catcher became more prevalent, as tribes began to expand across the country and tribe leaders could no longer watch over the infants of the tribe. Consequently, in the absence of tribe warriors, dream catchers were woven by maternal figures, such as mothers and grandmothers and were hung above a cradle to protect infants from being harmed in their sleep. 

Originally, to make the dream catcher, two spider webs were woven into the circle of the dream catcher. Spider webs were used, since their properties are such that they tend to trap and take hold of anything that comes in their path. Using this logic, it was thought that the spider webs in the dream catcher would trap any harmful elements in the air and provide a form of protection. This explains why the thread pattern in modern dream catchers happen to look similar to that of a spider’s web. 

Also key to note, is the circular frame and how it represents the constant flow of life; through the way the sun and moon orbit the earth in a continuous loop. Similarly, the number of different points on the dream catcher are thought to symbolise different meanings. For example, a dream catcher with 5 points is thought to resemble a star, whereas a dream catcher with 13 points is thought to represent the 13 different phases of the moon. 

In modern times, the dream catcher is said to have the purpose of catching good dreams and filtering them through the feathers to the person below. This is in addition to protecting that person from incurring bad dreams, through the motion of catching them in the ‘spiders web’. Now dream catchers can be seen across a variety of items including jewellery, phone cases, home decor etc. and are made from various different materials.

About the art:
I decided to draw the classic dream catcher but with an added twist, through combining the semi-circle of the dream catcher with a floral pattern. I then added in some detail using lines and dotting (‘stippling’), to add shading and dimension. 

I was glad to find an excuse to use my new sketch pad and drew this only using a pencil and some fine liner pens (0.3, 0.8 and 1.0 thickness). I am pleased with the result; in hindsight the only thing that I would have changed is that I would have used a circular object to draw around for the outer ring of the dream catcher, instead of chancing it freestyle, as I did above.

~

What would you like me to draw next? Comment below 🙂🕷

POP ART & FACIAL EXPRESSIONS: A MOOD

Which mood have you been sporting throughout the pandemic? The oh-so-cool chilled out vibe, the scared/stressed out look, the simply unhappy one, or a combination of them all?

Like many, I have experienced a combination of these moods…in fact, I experienced my own emotional journey whilst completing this artwork! Drawing faces has never been a strength of mine, but I persevered with this project, because I wanted to set myself a personal challenge and learn some new skills, as a part of my on-going art journey. It is safe to say that after numerous attempts, countless pencil sharpenings and a significantly reduced eraser, I am finally happy with the end result. Hallelujah!

About the artwork:
Pop Art has always been a style of art that I have enjoyed – it’s bold, fun and punchy.

Pop Art was invented in the USA in the 1950s and became a more prominent movement in the 1960s. It was part of the beginning of changing attitudes and moving away from more traditional forms of art. Unsurprisingly, this form of art paved the way for modern contemporary art styles such as feminist art, abstract art, minimalism and an increased use of facial expressions.

In the US, Pop Art came about as a response from many young artists who felt that art should capture what they experienced in their everyday lives – for these people, the sources of inspiration came from pop music, advertising and of course, comic books.

Pop Art was also widely used in wartime Britain, to increase morale and encourage people to sign up to the army and take on bigger roles elsewhere. Pop Art was further used for academic purposes, often serving a role in conveying messages of irony and parody.

Top tips:
Feedback from the comments in previous posts has shown that the top tips feature in my blog has been found to be helpful, so I have included my tips for this particular art style for you below: –

*Pop Art is known for being bright and bold. Do incorporate colours that are bright or provide a statement, such as yellow or red and do not blend colours together, to achieve a “bold” look. Feel free to use a combination of pencils, as well as coloured pens and paints for strength in colour.
*Add definition to your art piece, by going over all lines using fine liner pens and use a slightly thicker fine liner pen for outlining shapes.
*Pop Art incorporates stippling (use of dots), particularly within faces to add colour. The background of an image will usually contain dots and stripes; stripes can be used as a tool to support facial expressions and emotions – see the lady on the bottom of my artwork for reference.
*Pop Art faces will usually have big lips and eyes and less detailing on the nose.
*For text, use block letters and surround the text with a cloud or banner of colour.
*Fill up those blank spaces as much as you can!

Where to place this artwork:
Place in the bedroom, living room or a small, empty room to add style, attitude and plenty of personality to any setting!

A DAY OUT IN PRAGUE

This artwork is inspired by my travels; of which included a weekend trip to Prague. From its medieval cobbled streets to its cathedrals, galleries and museums, art is everywhere in this cultured and unique city! I was inspired by the intricacy of the special architecture, which showcases a prevalent gothic theme, alongside statues of fallen angels. Let’s not forget the pretty pastel coloured houses, which instantly uplifts spirits and can brighten anyone’s day. Accompanied by trams and lakes, Prague is a definite show-stopper and its beauty has been captured by many artists around the world.

Fun Fact: Prague houses its largest art gallery in the Czech Republic, which is so vast and expansive that it is spread across six different buildings.

About the art: This artwork began as a pencil sketch, which was outlined in fine liner pens to accentuate the details of the buildings. It was then coloured in using a combination of colouring pencils and oil-pastels, for the buildings, trams and streets. Finally, the sky was finished using paints (water colour paints achieve the best effect here, but as I didn’t have any, I used acrylics and applied some water in appropriate quantities for the desired effect).

My personal top tips:
*Always have a source of light, to add texture and dimension to any drawing – this can be seen in some of the blacked out windows, where I used a white oil pastel to contrast.
*Take your time and add plenty of detail using lines for shading.
*When painting the canvass, use the paint brush to wet the canvass a little; this provides a more pliable texture and prevents the paints from drying out. Always trial the colours on a separate piece of paper, to ensure that it is the desired shade before applying to the artwork.
*Do not be rigid and do blend several colours together to achieve the desired tones; in particular this piece is inspired by bright pastels, so these colours can be difficult to achieve alone. Oil pastels are a personal favourite of mine…I like the effect that they provide when you smudge them, allowing the easy blending of different colours.
*Yellows, oranges and whites are perfect for brightening, whereas blues, browns and blacks are great for achieving a deeper tone.

Due to the blue sky, this piece is best placed in a bright spot in the house, where it will catch light. Place in the living room to fill a blank wall space with a cultured and travelled vibe!

SPACED OUT

For my second art post, I wanted this to be a scenic piece, capturing a “dreamy” intergalactic theme. Most importantly, I envisioned it to incorporate my love for the starry night sky and planets in outer Space.

The art explained: The butterfly represents the “lens” to seeing another planet (in this case, I went with the appearance of Mars; sandy dunes and clouds of sand-dust with the moon providing brightness in the dark, star-lit sky). I felt that by leaving the final piece in black and white only, this best captured the detailing and illusion of a night sky, in addition to providing an excellent contrast.

This is a canvass piece sketched in HB pencil and bought to life by detailing and outlining using fine-liner pens. Intricacy is paramount in this piece!

This is perfectly placed in a bedroom, hanging above the bed for the ultimate night time visions.

FLOWER POWER

My first piece. The inspiration for this artwork goes back to a flower wall-print project at primary school; this was a project that I really enjoyed and felt that I was strong at.

When choosing between the different types of flowers for this piece, I thought about my favourite types of flowers; Sunflowers, as they are bright and uplift a persons’ mood, bringing happiness into any room; Roses, for an elegant and romantic vibe; Hibiscus for their tropical feel and intricacy in detail. And finally, small but sweet forget-me-nots…although tiny, they are impactful in their presence with their gorgeous pastel blue colour, which makes them stand out infinitely.

This piece was drawn using HB pencils firstly for the outline and finished with fine liner pens (I’d recommend using the Micron pens – they are a bit pricey – but definitely worth the hype in my unbiased opinion!). I drew this on a canvass, which I hung on my bedroom wall for chic vibes.

WordPress.com.

Up ↑

Create your website with WordPress.com
Get started